ARS Tasmania Newsletter – September 2018

  • Date: 5th September 2018
  • author: Lesley Gillanders

IN MY GARDEN

It was a relief to see the garden slowly waking up from its winter sleep. There are three plants of Daphne bholua in the garden and there are two honeyeaters diligently feasting on the nectar. Daphne genkwa is called 'D.Blue Daphne' due to the lavender -blue which open up the stems and held in clusters like Daphne odora 'rubra'.

Magnolia 'Star Wars' seemed to take ages to open. The large pink blooms on bare branches are quite eye catching. M.'Black Tulip' has deep purple black goblets shaped blooms. While Michelia doltsopa with large white blooms has had a name change and is now classed as Magnolia doltsopa. Ken bought a Eucalyptus caesia last year but the plant died and this week was able to purchase another one, so hope it will survive. It has an attractive white bark and enormous pink flowers.

Many years ago Ken produced a batch of seedling Rhododendron while we were at Longley. He planted several of these hybrids in the garden and called them R. 'Woodbank Hybrid'. This was a cross between R.'Little Glendoe' and R.aureum They flower in early August and even though frost ruins the blooms, it produces more as spring takes hold. R.'Ptarmigan' is a small plant in the rock garden with small white flowers. Enkianthus serrulotus with large creamy white bells on deciduous branches is one meter high. It is in a shaded bed at the front of the house.

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